“Can you hear me?” It's the latest scam.

If you get a call like this, know that you're being targeted by the latest scam sweeping the nation.

What should you do?

The FCC has warned that if you receive a call with this question, do not respond. Disconnect the call immediately. If you say "yes," your response is recorded and later used as a voice signature to make charges to your credit card or bank accounts via the telephone. 

According to the complaints the FCC has received, the callers may impersonate familiar companies or organizations to get you to answer and talk. If you have already received a call like this, make sure you check your financial accounts and bills to look for unauthorized charges. In addition, you can report the call to the Better Business Bureau Scam Tracker and the FCC Consumer Help Center

Every month, 2.4 billion people are harassed by robocalls. The FCC voted last month to begin a rulemaking process to eliminate robocalls. Until then, use the steps below to protect yourself. 

FCC Robocall Tips

  1. Do not answer calls from unknown numbers. Let them go to voicemail
  2.  Hang up if a caller asks you to hit a button to stop receiving calls. It's often a recording. Scammers often use that tactic to identify and target live respondents.
  3.  If you do answer a call that winds up being a scam, write the number down and add that to your FCC complaint.
  4.  Ask your telephone company if it has a robocall blocking service. If not, encourage your provider to offer one. You can also visit the FCC's website for information and resources on available robocall blocking tools to help reduce unwanted calls. 
  5. Register all of your telephone numbers in the National Do Not Call Registry at 1-888-382-1222. 

Sources: USA Today and ABC News 

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